Nan S. Russell
Author & Speaker

All posts in June, 2014

MB900435235[1]I’m currently working on a new book proposal and my time to keep up with interesting things that cross my desk has been waning. So, here are two articles I enjoyed and thought you might find interesting as well, along with my latest psychologytoday.com piece on workplace leadership and trust.

  • Coming back from setbacks and criticism can be difficult. I’ve been fired, reorganized, and passed over for promotion, and I’ll admit it’s hard to come back as if nothing happened. Just like it’s hard to have something you’ve worked on ”torn to shreds” by someone else. How do top leaders handle it? Here’s a good piece by Mark Thompson on the topic.
  • Mindfulness is the hot topic these days at work. Is it a fad, or an important element to help us escape from drowning in busyness? Does it represent the future of work? Check out the article by Samantha Cole on the topic.

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Things You May Have Missed 

rosie[1]A few months ago, several “Rosies” were honored at the White House for their home front efforts during World War II. One of them was 91 year old Phyllis Gould. Like her honored companions, Gould was a “Rosie the Riveter” during World War II. In the l940s three million women like her worked in plants as part of the war effort.

These women were nicknamed “Rosies” following a government marketing, “We Can Do It,” campaign encouraging them to take factory positions building aircraft and weapons. Not only was their work essential to the war effort, but they were doing jobs considered for-men-only and did them well. That began to erode beliefs about what women could or should do.

When asked by a reporter why being honored at the White House was important to her, Phyllis Gould responded, “My descendants will know I was somebody.” Her words got me thinking. Isn’t that what we all want? To be somebody; to know our lives made a difference – at least to someone? But, is it important to make a difference or have someone know about it? It seems to me, (continue reading →)

In the Scheme of Things